Alzheimer's disease

Explore Alzheimer's disease and access the tools you need to better understand this complex condition.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, affecting approximately 50 million people worldwide as of 2018 – a number expected to reach 152 million in 2050.1 The neuropathology of AD is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles outside and inside neurons respectively. 

Here you can take a deeper look at the disease and its pathophysiology, as well as a better understanding of the antibodies, kits, reagents, and other tools you need for your research.

Overview

​​

Alzheimer's disease pathway

Explore our interactive AD pathway poster to find the best products for your target of interest.

Get the pathway poster


The role of astrocytes in neurodegenerative disease

Learn more about the role of astrocytes in AD and other neurogenerative diseases from Assistant Professor Shane Liddelow from the Department of Neuroscience and Physiology at NYU Langone Medical Center. Here Prof. Liddelow covers topics including the role of astrocytes in response to AD, the mechanism of inducing reactive astrocytes, and astrocyte function in chronic neurodegenerative diseases. He also touches on some of his most recent work investigating the role of microglia in the activation of astrocytic response in neurodegeneration2.

Watch here to learn more about the role of astrocytes in neurodegenerative disease.

Learn more about the role of astrocytes in AD and other neurogenerative diseases from Assistant Professor Shane Liddelow from the Department of Neuroscience and Physiology at NYU Langone Medical Center. Here Prof. Liddelow covers topics including the role of astrocytes in response to AD, the mechanism of inducing reactive astrocytes, and astrocyte function in chronic neurodegenerative diseases. He also touches on some of his most recent work investigating the role of microglia in the activation of astrocytic response in neurodegeneration2.

Watch here to learn more about the role of astrocytes in neurodegenerative disease.

​If you're researching any of the targets mentioned in this video these products may be of interest to you.

Human IL-1a ELISA Kit (ab178008)​
Human TNF alpha ELISA Kit (ab181421)


Recombinant monoclonal antibodies for Alzheimer's disease research

Get reproducible, batch-to-batch consistency using recombinant monoclonal antibodies for your AD research. These are some of our best selling products. 

Recombinant Anti-Tau antibody [E178] (ab32057)
Recombinant Anti-Tau antibody [EPR22524-95] (ab254256)
Recombinant Anti-beta Amyloid 1-42 antibody [mOC64] - Conformation-Specific (ab201060)
Recombinant Anti-Amyloid Precursor Protein antibody [Y188] (ab32136)
Recombinant Anti-BACE1 antibody [EPR19523] (ab183612)
Recombinant Anti-Apolipoprotein E antibody [EPR19392] (ab183597)
Recombinant Anti-TREM2 antibody [EPR20243] (ab209814)


Beta-amyloid and tau 

Beta-amyloid and tau are two of the biggest players in AD research. To find out more about the role of beta-amyloid and tau in AD progression and to find out more about the products we have available for the products click the link below.

>>Beta-amyloid and tau tools and reagents


References

1. Alzheimer’s Research UK. Dementia Statistics Hub - Global Prevalence. Available at: https://www.dementiastatistics.org/statistics/global-prevalence/.

2. Joshi A.U., Minhas P.S., Liddelow S.A., Haileselassie B., Andreasson K.I., Dorn G.W. 2nd, Mochly-Rosen D. Fragmented mitochondria released from microglia trigger A1 astrocytic response and propagate inflammatory neurodegeneration. Nat Neurosci. 10, 1635-1648 (2019).







登録